missiles or

pavone senza piume

 

 

– An art-project by Sebastian Schmidt –

GALLERY

FREYJA

2011  |  80 cm x 250 cm  |  Fine Art Print on Hahnemühle PhotoRag Ultrasmooth 305 g

MILDA

2012  |  50 cm x 250 cm  |  Fine Art Print on Hahnemühle PhotoRag Ultrasmooth 305 g

SIONE

2013  |  50 cm x 250 cm  |  Fine Art Print on Hahnemühle PhotoRag Ultrasmooth 305 g

ANDRASTE

2014  |  100 cm x 250 cm  |  Fine Art Print on Hahnemühle PhotoRag Ultrasmooth 305 g

VIHANSA

2015  |  50 cm x 170 cm  |  Fine Art Print on Hahnemühle PhotoRag Ultrasmooth 305 g

ANAHIT

2016  |  100 cm x 370 cm  |  Fine Art Print on Hahnemühle PhotoRag Ultrasmooth 305 g

MAKING OF

ABOUT

EXCEPT FROM

"A CLASS OF ITS OWN"

ISSUE 05

 

Sebastian Schmidt is a German artist who lives and works in Berlin. He initially studied communication design and worked as an art director for several years developing numerous international campaigns at major advertising agencies. He now runs a small design agency in addition to working on the development of artistic projects.

 

What’s unusual about Sebastian Schmidt is his rather uncommon fascination with missiles. We’re talking huge killing machines that are bright, shiny and staged in a way commonly used for cars or mobile phones. And although they appear motionless and floating on air, one can almost feel the explosive danger and the power hidden behind the white steel bodies.

The idea for his large-scale ‘Missiles’ project came while working at one of the large advertising agencies. “My main task was to use Photoshop to place all sorts of consumer goods – from washing detergent to cars – in front of a white background and to make them very shiny. Hence, I turned any ordinary object into something desirable. Soon I started asking myself whether this could equally work with a clearly evil object, such as a cruise missile.”

 

The missile is a pure symbol of power, speed, energy and strength that makes the viewer feel stronger and more powerful. Schmidt jokes that it reflects some kind of inner archaic, primal brutality. This is a sentiment shared by others through a mixture of fascination and horror. “Basically I lure them into a trap: the picture of a beautiful weapon as a mirror of one’s own raw nature. But this enthusiasm does worry me. We guys carry a disturbing fascination for violence, which is in the best case controlled by societal values, but far from extinct.”

 

However, politics don’t have anything to do with it – missiles are exempt from national symbols. Instead, they bear the names of ancient goddesses, who often stand for both: war and love. A combination that is absolutely contradictory today, but for Sebastian Schmidt has one common core: the drive. “That’s why I like the phallic association, which many see in my pictures.” The artist further explains, “because of their size and complexity, missiles are more expensive than let’s say a handgun. Those are important factors in a status symbol, which you’re more likely to look at. On top of that this highly complex and multi-million dollar technology has the sole purpose to destroy others through its auto destruction. They can be used only once – considered cynically it’s amazingly decadent.”

 

The viewer can be fooled, mistaking these pieces for photography. In reality all ‘missiles’ are extensively recreated and staged on the computer up to the last detail. “I probably wouldn’t be allowed to take pictures of these weapons, or solely under the greatest safety precautions. In any case, even the best camera wouldn’t achieve this quality and sharpness. This result can only be achieved with professional 3D computer programmes.” Consequently tiny details, such as screw threads or hinges, often need to be designed by the artist himself with the intention of creating an overall coherent and photo-realistic image.

CONTACT

For more information and to answer your questions please contact me by email.

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missiles or

pavone senza

piume

 

 

– An art-project by Sebastian Schmidt –

For more information and to answer your questions please contact me by email.

sending message ...

Sorry – there has been an error.

Please try again!

Thank you!

Your message has been sent.

For more information and to answer your questions please contact me by email.

sending message ...

Sorry – there has been an error.

Please try again!

Thank you!

Your message has been sent.

missiles or

pavone senza

piume

 

 

– An art-project by Sebastian Schmidt –

missiles or

pavone senza

piume

 

– An art-project by Sebastian Schmidt –

FREYJA

2011  |  80 cm x 250 cm  |  Fine Art Print on Hahnemühle PhotoRag Ultrasmooth 305 g

MILDA

2012  |  50 cm x 250 cm  |  Fine Art Print on Hahnemühle PhotoRag Ultrasmooth 305 g

SIONE

2013  |  50 cm x 250 cm  |  Fine Art Print on Hahnemühle PhotoRag Ultrasmooth 305 g

ANDRASTE

2014  |  100 cm x 250 cm  |  Fine Art Print on Hahnemühle PhotoRag Ultrasmooth 305 g

VIHANSA

2015  |  50 cm x 170 cm  |  Fine Art Print on Hahnemühle PhotoRag Ultrasmooth 305 g

ANAHIT

2016  |  100 cm x 370 cm  |  Fine Art Print on Hahnemühle PhotoRag Ultrasmooth 305 g

MAKING OF

ABOUT

EXCEPT FROM

"A CLASS OF ITS OWN"

ISSUE 05

 

Sebastian Schmidt is a German artist who lives and works in Berlin. He initially studied communication design and worked as an art director for several years developing numerous international campaigns at major advertising agencies. He now runs a small design agency in addition to working on the development of artistic projects.

 

What’s unusual about Sebastian Schmidt is his rather uncommon fascination with missiles. We’re talking huge killing machines that are bright, shiny and staged in a way commonly used for cars or mobile phones. And although they appear motionless and floating on air, one can almost feel the explosive danger and the power hidden behind the white steel bodies.

The idea for his large-scale ‘Missiles’ project came while working at one of the large advertising agencies. “My main task was to use Photoshop to place all sorts of consumer goods – from washing detergent to cars – in front of a white background and to make them very shiny. Hence, I turned any ordinary object into something desirable. Soon I started asking myself whether this could equally work with a clearly evil object, such as a cruise missile.”

 

The missile is a pure symbol of power, speed, energy and strength that makes the viewer feel stronger and more powerful. Schmidt jokes that it reflects some kind of inner archaic, primal brutality. This is a sentiment shared by others through a mixture of fascination and horror. “Basically I lure them into a trap: the picture of a beautiful weapon as a mirror of one’s own raw nature. But this enthusiasm does worry me. We guys carry a disturbing fascination for violence, which is in the best case controlled by societal values, but far from extinct.”

 

However, politics don’t have anything to do with it – missiles are exempt from national symbols. Instead, they bear the names of ancient goddesses, who often stand for both: war and love. A combination that is absolutely contradictory today, but for Sebastian Schmidt has one common core: the drive. “That’s why I like the phallic association, which many see in my pictures.” The artist further explains, “because of their size and complexity, missiles are more expensive than let’s say a handgun. Those are important factors in a status symbol, which you’re more likely to look at. On top of that this highly complex and multi-million dollar technology has the sole purpose to destroy others through its auto destruction. They can be used only once – considered cynically it’s amazingly decadent.”

 

The viewer can be fooled, mistaking these pieces for photography. In reality all ‘missiles’ are extensively recreated and staged on the computer up to the last detail. “I probably wouldn’t be allowed to take pictures of these weapons, or solely under the greatest safety precautions. In any case, even the best camera wouldn’t achieve this quality and sharpness. This result can only be achieved with professional 3D computer programmes.” Consequently tiny details, such as screw threads or hinges, often need to be designed by the artist himself with the intention of creating an overall coherent and photo-realistic image.

 

 

 

CONTACT

For more information and to answer your questions please contact me by email.

sending message ...

Sorry – there has been an error.

Please try again!

Thank you!

Your message has been sent.

missiles or

pavone senza

piume

 

 

– An art-project by Sebastian Schmidt –

sebastianschmidt

GALLERY

FREYJA

2011  |  80 cm x 250 cm  |  Fine Art Print on Hahnemühle PhotoRag Ultrasmooth 305 g

MILDA

2012  |  50 cm x 250 cm  |  Fine Art Print on Hahnemühle PhotoRag Ultrasmooth 305 g

SIONE

2013  |  50 cm x 250 cm  |  Fine Art Print on Hahnemühle PhotoRag Ultrasmooth 305 g

ANDRASTE

2014  |  100 cm x 250 cm  |  Fine Art Print on Hahnemühle PhotoRag Ultrasmooth 305 g

VIHANSA

2015  |  50 cm x 170 cm  |  Fine Art Print on Hahnemühle PhotoRag Ultrasmooth 305 g

ANAHIT

2016  |  100 cm x 370 cm  |  Fine Art Print on Hahnemühle PhotoRag Ultrasmooth 305 g

MAKING OF

ABOUT

EXCEPT FROM

"A CLASS OF ITS OWN"

ISSUE 05

 

Sebastian Schmidt is a German artist who lives and works in Berlin. He initially studied communication design and worked as an art director for several years developing numerous international campaigns at major advertising agencies. He now runs a small design agency in addition to working on the development of artistic projects.

 

What’s unusual about Sebastian Schmidt is his rather uncommon fascination with missiles. We’re talking huge killing machines that are bright, shiny and staged in a way commonly used for cars or mobile phones. And although they appear motionless and floating on air, one can almost feel the explosive danger and the power hidden behind the white steel bodies.

The idea for his large-scale ‘Missiles’ project came while working at one of the large advertising agencies. “My main task was to use Photoshop to place all sorts of consumer goods – from washing detergent to cars – in front of a white background and to make them very shiny. Hence, I turned any ordinary object into something desirable. Soon I started asking myself whether this could equally work with a clearly evil object, such as a cruise missile.”

 

The missile is a pure symbol of power, speed, energy and strength that makes the viewer feel stronger and more powerful. Schmidt jokes that it reflects some kind of inner archaic, primal brutality. This is a sentiment shared by others through a mixture of fascination and horror. “Basically I lure them into a trap: the picture of a beautiful weapon as a mirror of one’s own raw nature. But this enthusiasm does worry me. We guys carry a disturbing fascination for violence, which is in the best case controlled by societal values, but far from extinct.”

 

However, politics don’t have anything to do with it – missiles are exempt from national symbols. Instead, they bear the names of ancient goddesses, who often stand for both: war and love. A combination that is absolutely contradictory today, but for Sebastian Schmidt has one common core: the drive. “That’s why I like the phallic association, which many see in my pictures.” The artist further explains, “because of their size and complexity, missiles are more expensive than let’s say a handgun. Those are important factors in a status symbol, which you’re more likely to look at. On top of that this highly complex and multi-million dollar technology has the sole purpose to destroy others through its auto destruction. They can be used only once – considered cynically it’s amazingly decadent.”

 

The viewer can be fooled, mistaking these pieces for photography. In reality all ‘missiles’ are extensively recreated and staged on the computer up to the last detail. “I probably wouldn’t be allowed to take pictures of these weapons, or solely under the greatest safety precautions. In any case, even the best camera wouldn’t achieve this quality and sharpness. This result can only be achieved with professional 3D computer programmes.” Consequently tiny details, such as screw threads or hinges, often need to be designed by the artist himself with the intention of creating an overall coherent and photo-realistic image.

 

 

For more information and to answer your questions please contact me by email.

sending message ...

Sorry – there has been an error.

Please try again!

Thank you!

Your message has been sent.

 

CONTACT