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missiles

 

An art-project by Sebastian Schmidt

GALLERY

FREYJA

2011  |  80 cm x 250 cm  |  Fine Art Print on Hahnemühle PhotoRag Ultrasmooth 305 g

MILDA

2012  |  50 cm x 250 cm  |  Fine Art Print on Hahnemühle PhotoRag Ultrasmooth 305 g

SIONE

2013  |  50 cm x 250 cm  |  Fine Art Print on Hahnemühle PhotoRag Ultrasmooth 305 g

ANDRASTE

2014  |  100 cm x 250 cm  |  Fine Art Print on Hahnemühle PhotoRag Ultrasmooth 305 g

VIHANSA

2015  |  50 cm x 170 cm  |  Fine Art Print on Hahnemühle PhotoRag Ultrasmooth 305 g

ANAHIT

2016  |  100 cm x 370 cm  |  Fine Art Print on Hahnemühle PhotoRag Ultrasmooth 305 g

EPONA

2017  |  50 cm x 170 cm  |  Fine Art Print on Hahnemühle PhotoRag Ultrasmooth 305 g

ABOUT

Cruise missiles operate over great distances from concealed locations and can cause enormous damage, and yet such weapons continue to fascinate in a disturbing way. Sebastian Schmidt’s work series “missiles” shows large depictions of tactical missiles on a confrontational level of reflection. Through their aesthetic mise en scène, he spans a diametrical arch between the highly dangerous subject and a pleasurable symbol of power. Schmidt questions the human enthusiasm for power and weapons. The series includes nine works and will be completed in 2018.

 

Plastic guns in our childhood or boss’ chairs in our adulthood: power fascinates us all, regardless of our age, religion, or nationality. Is striving for power part of human nature? “I remember that in our childhood we preferred dueling with swords, sinking toy pirate ships, or later using ego shooters to riddle targets with holes with virtual laser guns. Our mothers didn’t approve, but our fathers silently grinned. When I started working on cruise missiles years later, the feelings from my childhood emerged once again: a fascination for things destructive, powerful, and explosive. I suddenly found myself confronted with two questions: first, of all, why did a sensitive, enlightened, environmentally conscious young man feel this way? And second, was I the only one? I created pictures that were intended to examine this very issue, awakening a pleasure that is frowned upon in our modern, enlightened society,” as the artist puts it.

 

Schmidt seduces the beholder: the images depict missiles in purity and clarity; at first glance they seem to be virtually perfect images, almost innocent. At the same time, they raise associations that are charged with energy. It is only with reflection that the dimension of the motif becomes clear. Missiles symbolize the threat of war, and are used by states to demonstrate power in international conflict. The basic form and materiality of each and every missile relies on an actually existing model. Inscriptions, color, and graphic design are freely interpreted. The rockets, for example, feature the names of ancient goddesses that stood both for war and for love. What at first seems to be a photograph was modeled to the smallest detail in 3D programs and physically correctly rendered images, almost in original dimensions.

 

CGI (computer-generated imagery), known from film and advertising, is a young, still little explored realm of fine art. Schmidt sees CGI as its very own form of representation and relies on perfection and truth to detail. And yet, the missiles are not perfect: they have hairline scratches and traces of use, an imperfection, that not only lends the works a great deal of realism, but also offers a contrast to the apparently perfect mise en scène.

 

Sebastian Schmidt was born in Bamberg in 1983. Whether expressed in a meticulously built submarine using Lego or a realistic oil painting: his enthusiasm for art, technology, and perfection is something that has accompanied him since his earliest childhood. He studied at Design Akademie Berlin and has worked for several renowned advertising agencies, developing international campaigns for the consumer goods and automobile industry. In 2012, he founded the Berlin design agency KRAVT together with Jan Schulz.

 

 

CONTACT

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missiles

 

An art-project by Sebastian Schmidt

EPONA

2015  |  50 cm x 170 cm  |  Fine Art Print on Hahnemühle PhotoRag Ultrasmooth 305 g

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EPONA

2015  |  50 cm x 170 cm  |  Fine Art Print on Hahnemühle PhotoRag Ultrasmooth 305 g

For more information and to answer your questions please leave a message.

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sebastianschmidt

missiles

 

An art-project

by Sebastian Schmidt

GALLERY

FREYJA

2011  |  80 cm x 250 cm  |  Fine Art Print on Hahnemühle PhotoRag Ultrasmooth 305 g

MILDA

2012  |  50 cm x 250 cm  |  Fine Art Print on Hahnemühle PhotoRag Ultrasmooth 305 g

SIONE

2013  |  50 cm x 250 cm  |  Fine Art Print on Hahnemühle PhotoRag Ultrasmooth 305 g

ANDRASTE

2014  |  100 cm x 250 cm  |  Fine Art Print on Hahnemühle PhotoRag Ultrasmooth 305 g

VIHANSA

2015  |  50 cm x 170 cm  |  Fine Art Print on Hahnemühle PhotoRag Ultrasmooth 305 g

ANAHIT

2016  |  80 cm x 350 cm  |  Fine Art Print on Hahnemühle PhotoRag Ultrasmooth 305 g

EPONA

2015  |  50 cm x 170 cm  |  Fine Art Print on Hahnemühle PhotoRag Ultrasmooth 305 g

ABOUT

Cruise missiles operate over great distances from concealed locations and can cause enormous damage, and yet such weapons continue to fascinate in a disturbing way. Sebastian Schmidt’s work series “missiles” shows large depictions of tactical missiles on a confrontational level of reflection. Through their aesthetic mise en scène, he spans a diametrical arch between the highly dangerous subject and a pleasurable symbol of power. Schmidt questions the human enthusiasm for power and weapons. The series includes nine works and will be completed in 2018.

 

Plastic guns in our childhood or boss’ chairs in our adulthood: power fascinates us all, regardless of our age, religion, or nationality. Is striving for power part of human nature? “I remember that in our childhood we preferred dueling with swords, sinking toy pirate ships, or later using ego shooters to riddle targets with holes with virtual laser guns. Our mothers didn’t approve, but our fathers silently grinned. When I started working on cruise missiles years later, the feelings from my childhood emerged once again: a fascination for things destructive, powerful, and explosive. I suddenly found myself confronted with two questions: first, of all, why did a sensitive, enlightened, environmentally conscious young man feel this way? And second, was I the only one? I created pictures that were intended to examine this very issue, awakening a pleasure that is frowned upon in our modern, enlightened society,” as the artist puts it.

 

Schmidt seduces the beholder: the images depict missiles in purity and clarity; at first glance they seem to be virtually perfect images, almost innocent. At the same time, they raise associations that are charged with energy. It is only with reflection that the dimension of the motif becomes clear. Missiles symbolize the threat of war, and are used by states to demonstrate power in international conflict. The basic form and materiality of each and every missile relies on an actually existing model. Inscriptions, color, and graphic design are freely interpreted. The rockets, for example, feature the names of ancient goddesses that stood both for war and for love. What at first seems to be a photograph was modeled to the smallest detail in 3D programs and physically correctly rendered images, almost in original dimensions.

 

CGI (computer-generated imagery), known from film and advertising, is a young, still little explored realm of fine art. Schmidt sees CGI as its very own form of representation and relies on perfection and truth to detail. And yet, the missiles are not perfect: they have hairline scratches and traces of use, an imperfection, that not only lends the works a great deal of realism, but also offers a contrast to the apparently perfect mise en scène.

 

Sebastian Schmidt was born in Bamberg in 1983. Whether expressed in a meticulously built submarine using Lego or a realistic oil painting: his enthusiasm for art, technology, and perfection is something that has accompanied him since his earliest childhood. He studied at Design Akademie Berlin and has worked for several renowned advertising agencies, developing international campaigns for the consumer goods and automobile industry. In 2012, he founded the Berlin design agency KRAVT together with Jan Schulz.

 

 

CONTACT

For more information and to answer your questions please leave a message.

sending message ...

Sorry – there has been an error.

Please try again!

Thank you!

Your message has been sent.